Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Redemption: The Myth of Pet Overpopulation and the No Kill Revolution in America



In this riveting book, Nathan Winograd discusses animal sheltering in the United States and how this once compassionate movement is now the number one killer of companion animals. He goes on to speak of a new revolution of animal rescuers and how the idea of “No-Kill” is not only possible, but it returns to the very roots of why animal welfare programs were created…the commitment of the human/animal bond.

Between 1993 and 1994, Nathan took over the San Francisco SPCA and embarked on the No-Kill path. "If a community is still killing the majority of shelter animals, it is because the local SPCA, humane society, or animal control shelter has fundamentally failed in its mission," he writes. "And this failure is nothing more than a failure of leadership. The buck stops with the shelter's director." After seeing the SFSPCA embrace the no-kill ideology, Nathan took over the SPCA in Tompkins County, New York, and, literally overnight, ended the practice of killing due to lack of space.

Nathan’s book makes the case that insufficient shelter management leads to overcrowding; which is then confused with pet overpopulation. He states that instead of warehousing and killing animals, shelters should be implementing innovative programs (proven effective) to find those homes that statistics show are out there. Based on data from the American Veterinary Medical Associa¬tion, the American Animal Hospital Association, the Pet Food Manufacturers Association, and the latest census, there are more than enough homes for every dog and cat being killed in shelters every year.

"If all shelters not only have the desire and embrace the No-Kill philosophy, but comprehensively put into play all those programs and services that...I... collectively call the no-kill equation, then we would achieve success," says Nathan. He challenges us to demand more of our shelters, to insist an end to the use of killing as a form of population control, and he tells us to stop allowing our tax dollars and donations to support shelters that refuse to implement programs that have been proven to work to end the killing.

Nathan Winograd has spearheaded the No Kill Advocacy Center located in California to end the killing of pets in animal shelters. For more information please visit www.nokilladvocacycenter.org and for more information on Nathan and Redemption, please visit www.nathanwinograd.com

Thursday, May 08, 2008

Look Great While Supporting ACR!

Saint Francis Fashions
Cruelty Free Fashion with a Conscience
Saint Francis Fashions is proud to present the Cruelty Free Africa Collection.

Because of Popular Demand we are adding a 2" Wedge in our Pump Design, a 2" Wedge in our Sandal Design, and an Adorable Ankle Boot in a 2" Heel and a 3" Heel!


Each line includes 11 components, A Big Bag for carrying things back and fourth to the office or travel, a Clutch Bag for zipping out to lunch or a dressy dinner, a Sexy Sandal, a Sassy Pump, a Beautiful Boot, a Cute and Comfy Flat, and a Belt to tie it all together. Plus our latest additions, the 2" Wedge in the Pump and Sandal Style, and an Adorable Ankle Boot in a 2" and 3" Heel. You will always be ready for a change of weather, a change of season, or a change of scenery.

The Shoes were designed with Style and Comfort in mind. The heels are not more than 3" high, which is provocative, but wearable. The Pump, Boot and Flat have uniformly rounded toes, which give a young look, and prevent cramping. The Sandal toe opening is big enough to show your manicured toes, but small enough to keep your foot from sliding forward, and wide enough to give support and keep from pinching. All soles are rubber, so they are comfortable and quiet to walk in, and you never have to worry about slipping.

But best of all, no Animals were harmed in making these Accessories, and with every purchase you are donating to an Animal Welfare Organization, like Alley Cat Rescue, and helping Animals in need.

Saint Francis Thanks You, And The Animals Thank You!

We are ready to take Pre-Orders! By ordering now, Saint Francis will pay for shipping. Please go to our Online Store to place your order. If you don't see your item, go to the search tool on the sidebar.

http://www.saintfrancisfashions.com

Friday, May 02, 2008

Feral Cat Colony's Desperate Need for Relocation

Alley Cat Rescue is offering an opportunity for farmers to obtain “mouse patrollers” and for feral (undomesticated) cats to have a second chance at life.

A colony of feral cats living in Burtonsville, MD desperately needs to be relocated! Their caretaker is no longer able to provide for them and the cats must find a new place to call their home. All of the 20 cats have been trapped-neutered-returned and cared for over the past few years, so it is imperative that these kitties find a new place to live.

We are asking anyone with a farm, horse stable, or a few acres of land who is willing to give one or more of these cats a home to please contact us. Individuals who participate agree to confine the cats to an area of the barn for at least the first two weeks, thus increasing the likelihood that the cats will consider this their new “home” and stay put. After that, all the cats need is a safe shelter from weather and regular food and water. The reward for the barn owner—superior and dependable rodent control!

What is a “feral” cat? A cat that was born outside and has never lived with humans, or one that was a house cat, became lost, and has gone without human contact long enough to become unsocialized to humans. It is a cat that reverts back to living on instincts. Feral simply means “wild” or “untamed.” Even no-kill shelters, like ACR, are unable to place feral cats in homes. They will never be a family pet or companion animal. These beautiful cats (which number in the thousands in PG County alone), deserve to spend their days living the best life we humans can provide for them and it doesn’t take much.

These cats are ready for a new “home” and will gladly work hard for their room and board. They are truly experts in their field, making it clear to all mice that they are not welcome. So, if you’re tired of the “rat race” and would like to adopt one or several barn cats (neutered and vaccinated), please call Alley Cat Rescue at 301-277-5595 or email AlleyCatRescue@gmail.com for more details. If you’re unable to adopt at the moment, you can still help by providing a monetary contribution or by donating much-needed items like food, blankets, newspaper, litter, and cat toys. Every little bit helps. Thank you! You’re participation and support is greatly appreciated!

Thursday, May 01, 2008

The Cat Lady of Baghdad

Thanks to the Associated Press and NPR.org, we are brought the story of a one-woman army to rescue stray cats and dogs living in Baghdad. Louise, a former soldier and now security consultant, has been working to rescue cats and dogs from the war-torn areas of Iraq for the last few years. “Completing piles of paperwork, calling countless officials and, on one occasion, bursting into tears at the airport have all been required to get animals out of the war zone.”

Since rescuing her first cat, Simba, three years ago, Louise has managed to send four more cats and two dogs back to her native England. The costs (up to $3,500 an animal) are covered by donations and her "old stuff" sold on eBay. Any animal imported into Britain must go through a six-month quarantine.

It is impossible to gauge how many dogs, cats, and other animals have been rescued the past five years by soldiers and foreigners. The London-based Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad says there are no established groups actively working in Iraq to rescue small animals.

Thousands of stray cats and dogs in Baghdad's Green Zone and on U.S. military installations have been trapped and euthanized under a U.S.-funded program. Strays can spread rabies and other diseases that could be transmitted to soldiers, said Lt. Col. Raymond F. Dunton, chief of preventive medicine for the military in Iraq.

Last year, nearly 7,100 animals were caught in humane traps, Dunton said. Of those, about 5,300 were euthanized.

To find out more information please visit:
Baghdad Cat Rescue: http://www.baghdadcatrescue.com
Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad: http://www.spana.org